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The Bendis Backlog

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You may or may not know this. Despite having been brought up around comics and CCGs, I don’t actually have a lot of comics knowledge. I can tell you the different publishers and most of the big names. I can describe what I find appealing about storylines and panel layout, but I’m not very well versed in the classics or in many author’s works in an extensive basis.

So, I’m trying to identify some works and persons on whom I can focus.

For the next few months, I’m going to be trying to catch up on some Brian Michael Bendis. This is no mean feat. First, Bendis is a Marvel legend and has had a go at almost every major Marvel hero or team there is. His list of works is huge. To top it off, alot of what he does and is really famous for can be hard to get a hold of. Check it out, his list of works is HUGE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Michael_Bendis)

Some things I’m looking forward to reading by Bendis and crew:

Fire,
Jinx,
A.K.A. Goldfish
Torso,
Alias (especially hard to secure, may take a while), and
Powers

Things I want to keep reading by Bendis and crew:
Magneto
Uncanny X-Men (current run)

Most of this is his more self-contained works. To be honest, the Bendis-verse is a scary place to enter into. I thought it prudent to limit myself to his more consumable stuff so I don’t get overwhelmed. Let me know what you think. Anything I’m missing?

Reaction GIF for Parasite by Mira Grant

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I spent all last night finishing Parasite by Mira Grant. My whole reaction was pretty much:

How I felt when reading. I could see what was there, but jumped anyway.

Keep tuned. A full review will be up later in the week.

A bit of a belated #FridayReads

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Happy Fourth of July to those of you in the US. Here’s a Friday Reads for the week.

This week’s reads:
The Martian by Andy Weir
Habibi by Craig Thompson
Leviathan Wakes by James S.A. Corey

Upcoming Reads:
The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros
Slaughterhouse 5 by Kurt Vonnegut
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

Tic Tac Tome from QuirkBooks!

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Tic Tac Tome from QuirkBooks!

So, I haven’t beaten this yet, but I have tied it (after a good thirty minutes)! Ah hah!

Tic Tac Tome is a book that plays you in Tic Tac Toe. It allows you to play through a variety of boards that adapt as you play. I’m looking forward to bringing this to my family barbeques to see if any of my siblings or cousins can beat it.

Bout of Books Day 4 (Thursday)

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So, I’ve been doing alright with my Bout of Books 10.0 Challenge.

When I started, I set out to read:

The Road by Cormac McCarthy
Let Me In by John Ajvide Linqgvist
and
Pathfinder by Orson Scott Card

I was able to finish up The Assassin King by Elizabeth Haydon. I wanted to make sure I read it to give me some context for the ARC I have for her upcoming book. I was finished with it by the end of day one.

I then started in on McCarthy’s The Road and have really enjoyed it. That same day, I read a novelette by R.J. Palacio, The Julian Chapter: A Wonder Story.

Day three, though, was a slow one.

Work was hard and I wasn’t able to get anything read. I came home exhausted and read a total of 30 pages. I was pretty uninspired to read.

I did pull out a graphic novel, though. I finished the first half of Manifest Destiny Vol 1. It’s a pretty campy story about Lewis and Clarke. It features buffallo headed men and plants that turn humans into zombies.

Today, I’m getting into Let Me In . I’m almost a hundred pages in and it’s starting to roll. It’s a better feeling.

Let me know what’s up with you. What’s going on in your Bout of Books challenge?

#BoutofBooks10 Announcements and TBR

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So, it’s now official from May 12th – 18th I will be participating in the Bout of Books read-a-thon. I’ve posted my B-O-B reading list below. Give me a heads up if you want to read with me!

The Road by Cormac McCarthy
The Road by Cormac McCarthy

Pathfinder by Orson Scott Card
Pathfinder by Orson Scott Card

Let Me In by John Ajvide Lindqvist (Movie Tie In)
Let Me In by John Ajvide Lindqvist

The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson
The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson (This one will be my last TBR book. I don’t expect to finish it during the Read-a-thon)

Friday Reads

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So, with the upcoming holiday, I’m heading to my parent’s home. It’s four and a half hours away on a good day and I’m not really expecting to be able to film, but here’s an update nonetheless.

What I’ve read last week:

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Songs of the Earth and Trinity Rising by Elspeth Cooper.
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
Dark Eden by Chris Beckett

Upcoming Reads:

Dune by Frank Herbert

I’m about half way through Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close and it’s pretty great so far. I’ll probably be done reading it by the end of the weekend and will update with a full review at that point, but WOW!

I’m about fifty pages into Dune by Frank Herbert. I’m really looking forward to dedicating some time to this bad boy. It’s not as long as some other books I’ve read this past month and a half, but it’s dense.

After these two are finished, I’m hoping to read the most recent of Elspeth Cooper’s Wild Hunt quartet. I recieved these three from Worlds Without End in a giveaway and I’d like to finish it while the other two are fresh in my head.

What about you? Reading anything good?

Mental Disability in Literature

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As some of you may know, it’s autism awareness month. This is a very special issue to me; my older brother, G, has very severe autism and my childhood took place in an environment where that was not an unusual or strange thing.

I understand more than most what a mixed blessing a family member with disability can be, particularly when that disability is mental. There are frustrations and anger, but also love and compassion. This is why it irks me when I see most portrayals of mental disability in literature, especially SF/F.

Literature often does not portray mental disability well. Whether out of ignorance or inability to show the complex family and social dynamics, literature (as well as many other storytelling medium) fall far short of the mark. I often find that, in fiction, persons with disability are used more as a plot device than as a character with purpose and emotion. This is not something done maliciously or out of some anger towards those with disability, but perhaps it happens because we take people for granted–people of all shapes, sizes, and ability.

I’ve put below some of my favorite representations of autism and disability below. I’d love to hear yours.

Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck

A Song of Fire and Ice, George R.R. Martin (This is not for Hodor’s protrayal, which I find largely disappointing, but for his relationship with his grandmother, who loves and accepts him for who he is despite her frustrations.)

Flowers for Algernon, Daniel Keyes

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, by Jonathan Safran Foer